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For the third year in a row, demonstrators are marching in the nation's capital and cities around the country for the Woman's March.

In Washington, D.C., crowds of women wearing pink hats are marching from Freedom Plaza, advocating for women, immigrants and LGBTQ people. They're taking to the streets just weeks after a record number of women was sworn into Congress.

Nursing requires hands-on training. But research has found that university curriculum often goes light on one of life's universal experiences — dying. So some colleges have gone to new lengths to make the training more meaningful.

There's a sound near the end — the death rattle. People stop swallowing. The lungs fill up. There can be involuntary moaning.

"So you get all that noise. And that's really distressing for family members," Professor Sara Camp of Nashville's Belmont University says.

We've invited the longtime, late night talk show host to play a game called "Team Coco, meet hot cocoa!" Conan O'Brien is now host of Conan on TBS, and has a new podcast called Conan O'Brien Needs a Friend.

Click the audio link above to find out how he does.

For weeks, a crackdown on fuel theft by the Mexican government has led to widespread gas shortages and miles-long lines at gas stations.

So when a pipeline in the state of Hidalgo burst open Friday, sending a spray of fuel into the air, area residents rushed to collect it in buckets and barrels.

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Two hours later, the gushing pipeline exploded, turning what had been an excited gathering into a hellish inferno.

Two deaths in early January, of percussionist Alvin Fielder and multi-instrumentalist/poet/dramaturge Joseph Jarman, help remind us that artists' lives shouldn't be summarized by their documented works alone. Both men made signature contributions to the freedoms and complications that have enriched what we know as jazz, starting more than 50 years ago as founding members of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM).

Cheryl Day makes hundreds of biscuits a day, churning them out by hand at Back In The Day Bakery in Savannah, Ga. Tall and golden, with flaky layers and a lightly crunchy exterior, people come from miles around to eat them each morning, slathered with pepper jelly, stuffed with eggs and bacon, or simply smeared with a little butter.

Opinion: Leaving Syria Is Far Less Risky Than Staying

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Aaron David Miller (@aarondmiller2), a vice president at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and a former State Department adviser and Middle East negotiator, is the author of The End of Greatness: Why America Can't Have (and Doesn't Want) Another Great President.

Richard Sokolsky, a nonresident senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, was a member of the secretary of state's Office of Policy Planning from 2005-2015.

In Holy Lands, Harry Rosenmerck, an aging cardiologist, has left New York and his medical practice to move to Israel — to raise pigs.

His ex-wife, Monique, is battling illness. Their son David has been estranged from Harry since he came out. Their daughter Annabelle is heartsick in Paris. And his rabbi is appalled.

One of the hottest tickets on Broadway this season is Network, the stage adaptation of the 1976 movie about a news anchor who cracks up on the air and the executives who exploit his ravings for ratings.

Lisa Abramson says that even after all she's been through — the helicopters circling her house, the snipers on the roof, and the car ride to jail — she still wants to have a second child.

That's because right after her daughter was born in 2014 — before all that trouble began — everything felt amazing. Lisa was smitten, just like she'd imagined she would be. She'd look into her baby's round, alert eyes and feel the adrenaline rush through her. She had so much energy. She was so excited.

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